Uploading content on a regular basis is not easy. You release an Official Music Video with an album release but then that’s it, how do you keep the ball rolling and picking up momentum?

To keep your Youtube channel active and searchable you need to be uploading content regularly, it is the key to good SEO and engagement on all channels, YT, FB and Instagram.

It remains a fact that the ability to create quality video is becoming more achievable by the day. The latest iPhone has a video quality that rivals even very expensive DSLR cameras.

So now we know we have the necessary equipment, even in our pockets, what are the types of content other than Official Music Videos are out there for you to engage your audience with?

1. Live Excerpts

Live music is the core musical medium. Fans love to see their favourite bands rocking it on the stage, it’s the artists natural habitat and allows fans to view the artist through a truthful lens. Live videos garner many views, especially when teasing unreleased material, so feel free to record some excerpts and deliver to your social media & Youtube.

Bare in mind:

Sound Quality, although the cameras on phones are amazing, the microphones are lacking. If you’re able to use an audio recorder and sync this with your phone video it will increase the viewing experience. It feels less spontaneous but it is straight forward to synchronise the sound with free editing software and your fans will love you for it.

2. Acoustic Sessions

A concert is amazing. But a private concert gives you the edge of exclusivity. To further strengthen the bond with your audience, why not organise a performance in a studio or more interesting location?

Shoot this performance and put the video on your channel. If you have multiple tracks (one video per song), even more content! Again, you could do this with a phone and use a handy audio recorder, you will be surprised at the quality.

Set the mood, get a few lamps together and really set the scene. Sometimes we rely a lot on post-production to add colour to a scene but a few nicely placed lights and some ornaments can really nourish a scene.

3. Backstage Moments

Fans love to see what’s going on behind the scenes. Working in the music industry we can sometimes take for granted having access to this area, an area most regular listeners would dream of visiting, but you could be offering them that glimpse.

There’s no need for over the top dramatics, you can do this with a phone, get a musician or relevant person who is not too camera shy to guide and explain what’s going on: We’re backstage at… This is the dressing room for…

The key is context, once that’s established you can roam freely, taking shots of the backstage creating a unique and coherent piece of content.

4. Studio Sessions

The studio they say is where the magic happens. Why not offer a glimpse at the faders, sliders and live booth? It’s the same principle as backstage footage, there are many fans out there that aspire to learn what is happening, the more the fan learns about your artist the closer they feel to them.

What can you talk about? The equipment in use, the engineer, what you’re doing (recording album, single), the locations, what bands have been there previously even throw in an ad-hoc performance.

5. Cover videos with photos (backstage, studio)

We call cover videos (a video that is a static image of cover art) pack shot videos. It’s great for people looking for audio on Youtube as it’s sometimes people’s preferred destination.

It can be good to go one further however, by including a slideshow or a dynamic visualisations in the background with logos over the top. This will push users to watch the video to the end.

You can leverage the pack shot by including links to Spotify playlists and using buy links to get the most out of the content.

6. Archive Footage

It can be easy to think about footage as content. But we see with heritage bands such as Queen and Spandau Ballet, that while even though their lives were busy, hectic, they are thankful now 30 years on that people were filming and following them so that they might be able to share the memories with fans and even relive it themselves.

If you have any footage like that share away but also capturing footage that might one day be archive, so you can look back at your legacy. Spandau Ballet even recently released a fully fledged documentary off the back of this.

7. Communicate Directly To Your Fans

Again we take for granted our ability to reach and communicate with fans like never before. Previously it was a case of a fan having to write a letter via post (remember that old thing?), now it’s a click of a button.

Fans are your best ambassadors. Word of mouth is not a form of marketing you can pay for, but by talking to your fans directly they may answer back or even tell their friends about the conversation. It’s not everyones style to reply, but if you can get through that barrier it pays dividends.

Check French artist Youssoupha who wished a happy New Year to his youtubers and youtube users HERE or Guillaume Pley who thanks their 150000 subscribers HERE

8. Interviews

Fans are always interested in learning more about an artist, on an opinion, on their ethos, many factors. You can create these videos yourself or even collate existing interviews into a playlist. In terms of creating an interview you could answer fan questions (ask me anything) and more.

There are many ways an interview can be done. Interviewer on-screen or off-screen asking some pre-designated questions, or even off the cuff if they’re witty enough, but remember it’s about the artist so focus on their answers.

Another cool way is an Ask Me Anything. Reach out on Social Media for questions that a fan would love to ask the artist in question. Filter through, get the best ones, print them on a piece of paper and hand them to the artist. It’s ok to be contrived and let the artist think of a few answers before-hand for more thought through responses.

Again you can do this with your trusty smart phone and audio recorder.

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